Tag Archives: books

Coming Home to Myself

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Fall is in full-swing and it feels like winter is just around the corner! Every year I get excited for this slow-down period. As the natural environment edges toward a scene of sparseness and simplicity, so does the calendar of events. However, I cannot say the same for what may be stirring within our household.

This autumn, my husband and I took on a 25 day whole foods detox led by a fellow holistic health studies classmate of mine, Katie Jasper. More on that to come. We are only 7 days in, but so far, the results have been wonderful. As we are home cooking and eating in community, we both feel more energized, clear-headed, and grounded. With this new excitement and clarity, we feel like we started trekking down a path together that is so important and truly rejuvenating. What really is happening is we are simply making the commitment to live a healthier, holistic life. While I can go on and on making it sound all flowery and unicorn-like, I would rather point out that plenty of the purgative experience is dealing with the “mess in the basement” that is not related to the foods we are eating.

The “mess in the basement” is the not-so-pleasant or hip or happy parts of what makes me…me. It’s the parts of myself that I know can be destructive if not handled appropriately or acknowledged. From a big picture standpoint, it’s the greater reason why people get sidetracked on the road coming home to themselves.

The detox has acted as a catalyst and plunged me right into a ritual that happens every year at this time – the practice of going inward, self-reflecting, accepting, and letting go. It is different and yet it is the same – and as the days shorten and the darkness surrounds me all over again, I continue to look forward to what I will encounter this year.

Below is an excerpt from a wonderful book, written by Marion Woodman that pairs well with this time of year and with this post. Her work is appropriately named, Coming Home to Myself: Reflections for Nurturing a Woman’s Body and SoulI think all people can relate to it, so I hope that this snippet inspires you to take some time to experience what it means to come home to yourself and to explore the “mess in your basement.”

Happy Fall!    

In my dream,

I was a priestess

and had prepared

the altar for great celebration.

The flowers were almost in place,

the roses almost in the center

of the sunlit altar.

(I could not make the roses fit

within the light.)

A shadow the shape of a cross came through a window.

 

An old man came to me and said,

Your hymns will never rise to heaven

until you clean up your mess in the basement.

 

But there’s no basement in this temple, I said.

That’s the problem: there is, he replied.

 

Down the rotting old steps we went

and found a slimy lagoon.

A water wheel,

joining basement to temple, lay still.

 

A huge serpent writhed,

trying and failing and trying again

to center its head on the wheel.

It knew its task was to turn the wheel–

quiet, rhythmic–with its head.

 

I tried to move the wheel towards the serpent

and it struck.

The old man pulled me out of danger,

You can’t move so fast

She doesn’t trust you.

Hasten slowly;

you will make her your friend.

 

For twenty years,

the wheel has creaked but turned;

The lagoon, fresh; 

the serpent, Sophia;

the roses, not yet in place.

 

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Breaking Down Walls: Cultivating Awareness, Nourishing the Soul

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Today’s post challenges us to break down the walls that we create inside ourselves. The idea and excerpts came from a book that I highly recommend, The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer. According to Singer, our continued focus on our thoughts and emotions create walls inside of us. We pay so much attention to these thoughts and emotions that we eventually stop noticing everything else, and worse yet, we stop going beyond the borders they create.

Try to knock these walls down. It won’t be easy.  Notice “the closer you get, the more you will have the urge to pull back. That which you collected from your past forms a boundary you intuitively want to avoid. That’s natural, that’s what we do with walls; we avoid running into them.”  However, just because it feels uncomfortable doesn’t mean you should stop. Go there and be with the discomfort. Because the moment “you avoid running into them, they lock you inside their perimeter. They become your prison because they are the boundaries of your awareness. Because you are not willing to approach them, you cannot see what is beyond them.”

Once we stop going beyond ourselves we lose the ability to grow individually and spiritually. If we cannot go beyond ourselves,  we will never have a transpersonal awakening–we will never connect to that which is greater than ourselves. The line between ourselves and the world will remain at a disconnect. As long as we remain removed from one another, our individual and collective health and well-being will suffer. However, if we work on breaking down our walls and we become aware of our walls, we make progress toward becoming our true selves instead of being reduced to our feelings and emotions.

Take five minutes, find a quiet space and think about your walls. Think about your thought patterns and how they are serving you today. What would it be like if you let go of those thoughts and just witnessed them as nothing more than thoughts? Think about all the worrying you do. What if you just let those worries go? What would you start noticing in your life that you were unable to notice before? How would you grow? How would this new way of being affect the health and well-being of you and those around you? Climb the walls; break them down and watch what happens when you start seeing what lies beyond them.